Extra Credit Opportunities

There are a few extra credit opportunities that you might pursue for this class if you are so interested. In all cases, these opportunities will take the form of a short reflective blog post (about 250 words) in response to an on-campus event outside of our classroom that I have pointed out as having some connection to the topic of care. Ideally, in that post you will reflect on both the event and how it relates to our course in the process sharing your experience of it and the insights engendered by it with the rest of the class.


February 1

soundandthefuryposter

 

 


Feb 5

“Refugee Crisis, Human Rights, and Medicine” 

When: Friday, Feb. 5, 1:00-3:00pm

Where: Jones Room, Woodruff Library

http://news.emory.edu/stories/2016/02/er_refugee_medicine/campus.html

As one of the open sessions of Professor Valerie Loihot’s University Course “Discourse of Disaster,” Emory Cardiologist and Syrian refugee Heval Mohamed Kelli (MD) and Abdullahi Ahmed An-Na’im (PhD), distinguished Professor of Law at Emory will discuss human rights and the practice of medicine in relation to the current refugee crisis affecting the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and the world.


March 1 Disability Community Day of Mourning

https://www.facebook.com/events/891244894325765/

This event will be taking place on Tuesday, March 1 between 6 and 8pm at the First Baptist Church of Decatur (308 Clairemont Ave. Decatur, GA 30030). Before attending, I recommend reading this short piece which described why these events started a few years ago: http://autisticadvocacy.org/2012/04/killing-words/ Additionally, you might take a look at this more comprehensive discussion of filicide in relation to the disability community: http://autisticadvocacy.org/home/projects/disability-community-day-of-mourning/anti-filicide/

 


March 17

Montello Poster.png

“It’s All in the Stories: The Moral Work of Narrative” featuring Martha Montello (Harvard Medical School)

When: 6:30pm on Thursday, March 17

Where: Emory Center for Ethics Commons 102

What: The Center for Ethics presents It’s All in the Stories: The Moral Work of Narrative featuring Martha Montello (Harvard Medical School). RSVP at HEC@emory.edu.

Sponsored by the Emory Healthcare Ethics Consortium

The blog post reflecting on this event and its possible connections to our class and discussions of care for extra-credit is due to our course blog by midnight, March 20. 


“Pictures of Nursing: The Zwerdling Postcard Collection”

 

 

Hero-Picture-Nursing-Exhibit.png

http://web.library.emory.edu/news-events/news/archives/2016/nursing-postcards-exhibit-whscl.html

Through March 20, when the exhibit will close, you might visit the “Pictures of Nursing: The Zwerdling Postcard Collection” exhibit over in the Woodruff Health Sciences Center Library and write up a response to it (which should be posted to the blog by midnight on Sunday March 20.


March 21

Disability Studies Initiative Film Screening: The Theory of Everything 

When: 7:00-9:30 pm on Monday, March 21

Where: Center for Ethics, room 102

What: A screening of The Theory of Everything followed by a post-film discussion with Allison Butler (Director of Emory’s Office of Access, Disability Resources, and Services) and George Hentschel (Emory Professor of Physics)

The blog post reflecting on this event and its possible connections to our class and discussions of care for extra-credit is due to our course blog by midnight, March 25. 


March 24

“Birthing Justice: Policing, Reproduction, and the Making of Freedom”

http://emorywhm.com/2016/01/02/event-7/

birthingjustice.png

When: 6pm on Thursday, March 24

Where: Oxford Presentation Room, Oxford Building (the building that houses the bookstore)

What: This Women’s History Month Keynote will feature a conversation between Johnetta Elzie of We The Protesters and Monica Raye Simpson of SisterSong and “will interrogate the intersections of the movement against police brutality and the movement for reproductive justice. Moderated by Whitney Peoples.”

The blog post reflecting on this event and its possible connections to our class and discussions of care for extra-credit is due to our course blog by midnight, March 27. 


March 29

Emory Reproductive Health Association Screening of No Más Bebés

http://emorywhm.com/2016/01/01/march-29/

When: 7pm on Tuesday, March 29

Where: Room 3001, Claudia Nance Rollins Building

What: “No Más Bebés tells the story of Madrigal v. Quilligan, a historic lawsuit filed by ten immigrant women who had been sterilized without their consent in the 1970s. Focusing on four of the original plaintiffs, No Más Bebés examines the intersection of race, gender and socioeconomic status, and brings a new perspective to the ongoing struggle for reproductive autonomy.”

The blog post reflecting on this event and its possible connections to our class and discussions of care for extra-credit is due to our course blog by midnight, April 3. 


March 31

Emory School of Nursing Presents: Beyond Angels and Handmaidens: The Impact of Gender on Nursing Work – Past, Present and Future

http://emorywhm.com/2015/01/09/event-1/

When: Noon on Thursday, March 31

Where: TBA

What: “In commemoration of Women’s History Month, this presentation highlights an arena of women’s work that is often overlooked in both women’s and medical histories – nursing. Nursing is one of the main professions through which women have sought and gained financial, intellectual and personal independence. Yet this is a fraught history, because it is often this very gendered nature of nursing that has proven a cause of conflict and tension for the profession, its leaders, and for nursing practice. Historically nursing has been seen as a women’s profession because it was linked to the so-called inherent traits of women’s natural goodness, caring and compassion. Women cared as nurses because they were women, not trained professionals, and didn’t need to be paid accordingly. As historian Susan Reverby has noted, nurses are ‘ordered to care, in a society that doesn’t value caring’. Nurse leaders fought long and hard to develop nursing’s professional status and legitimacy based on scientific knowledge that would facilitate the development of autonomous practice. On many counts, they succeeded. But the issue of gender still looms large in nursing, and continues to impact on the profession in clinical, academic and policy arenas.

This seminar explores issues from nursing’s history to considering the lingering impact of gender on the profession today as it seeks to negotiate the complex terrains of advanced practice, evidence based medicine, and patient centered care. Drawing on examples from history, women’s studies and feminist theory, we consider some of the gendered issues still facing the profession and its students, and pose vital questions for the future.”

The blog post reflecting on this event and its possible connections to our class and discussions of care for extra-credit is due to our course blog by midnight, April 3. 


April 4

human cooperation.jpg

When: 4 pm on Monday, April 4th

Where: Anthropology Building, Room 303

What: One day, humans were as selfish and unaltruistic as the rest of the animal kingdom. The next, we were actually the only altruists, and the only truly cooperative species. We had not regular reciprocity, but strong reciprocity. We were “super cooperators.” Behavioral economists called human cooperation a “huge anomaly.” We were not just biologically altruistic, but genuinely so. We were the only ones who cared about the welfare of others, with empathy, and the only ones with joint intentionality.
But if true, how come our best evolutionary theories about cooperation and altruism derive from animal behavior? I will argue that this whole movement to elevate human cooperation above the rest is built on sand. There are indeed a few differences, but I will discuss empathy, cooperation, partner choice, sense of fairness, and reciprocity in other species, enough to make the point of continuity in all respects.


April 13

Disability, Anthropology and Ethics

(Featuring Medical Anthropologist Dr. Jennifer Sarrett) 

When: Wednesday, April 13 from 5-6PM

Where: White Hall 103

disability and anthropology.jpg

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